I kicked off CES 2019 at the CES KeyNote Event hosted by Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association.

CTA State of the Industry Address and IBM Keynote

Gary presented a few key insights for future application in product, systems and organizational development:

We will solve more problems in the next two decades than we solved in the last two centuries.

We all need to think horizontally and look for different ways to collaborate to solve problems. Vertical industries are a thing of the past.

Let’s all work together to create a world where everyone has access to healthcare, services and a better world for everyone.

This all points to the significant challenge of working on the right problems for the right reasons. Although the keynote event was inspiring, the challenges of the real world awaited on the streets of Las Vegas. The commute from the Venetian to the Convention Center is 2.1 miles and a 10-minute drive in light traffic, as measured by Google Maps.

The actual commute consumed at least an hour using UberX. I know, these are developed world problems in a world where vast numbers of people are struggling to find water, food and medicine for their children. In any case, Las Vegas’ busy streets offer an opportunity to unpack the real world challenges described by Gary Shapiro in his excellent keynote presentation.

Our cities are now more populated and crowded than at any time in our history and the global population is expanding. Many of us, in the developed world, are living longer lives. This simply translates to more people moving around in our cities of the future, leading to more congestion, even longer commute times, and a greater environmental impact as well.

Parking in Las Vegas is already a blood sport and very expensive when you are lucky enough to either find a spot or valet your car. Again, a developed world problem, but let’s continue our exploratory journey into mass transit of the future.

CES 2019 offered a glimpse into the future of shared mobility transportation, autonomous vehicles, EV and alternative energy vehicles.

There was an increased focus this year on shared mobility transportation (compared to CES 2018) and this is a really good development.

“Last mile transportation” solutions are being tested in cities and some universities. Initial indicators are encouraging for this mode of moving from point A to point B in a relatively closed landscape. The city of Las Vegas can apply shared solutions from the one end of the strip using existing feeder streets and/or, possibly, a small vehicle lane on the borders of the congested strip. This is an ideal city to prove out advanced applications and technologies.

As Gary Shapiro pointed out in the keynote, we need horizontal and collaborative thinking to solve the world’s biggest problems. This will require open innovation and contributions from municipal, corporate, universities and agile entrepreneurs. The future is indeed exciting and it’s a wonderful time to be in the vehicle development business.

Interested in learning more about Fredricks Design’s CES 2019 findings? Please contact us to schedule a detailed review, or to learn more about our work in vehicle development.

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